The Tiffany Stained Glass Windows at
Saint James Episcopal Church, Fordham, Bronx NY

Lilies and Apple Blossoms
The Last Supper
The Resurrection Morn
The True Vine
The Resurrection Angel
Saints Monica and Augustine

The Tiffany Windows at Saint James Church represent a miniature "Tiffany Museum" of some his finest work. The works are examples of Louis Comfort Tiffany's craft, from the late nineteenth century up through 1929 (Tiffany died in 1933).

Tiffany was very proud of the windows commissioned for Saint James, and four of them were included in his own published partial lists of his work,. (The final two windows were commissioned after his last published listing, which was issued in 1910) The church was featured in a February 2008 episode of "Great Masters of Art: Louis Comfort Tiffany" (Bi no kyojintachi) on Tokyo TV. The program has generated significant interest in Japan, and Saint James is happy to wish many visitors a very earnest "Irrasshaimase!"

These windows show Tiffany's characteristic techniques to good advantage:

Lilies and Apple Blossoms

A splendid floral tribute to Julia Wheeler TIffany, the late wife of the third Rector of Saint James Church, Charles Comfort Tiffany. Note the large chunks of glass used as "jewels" in the cross at the top trefoil. This superb window was featured in a full page color illustration in Alistair Duncan's Tiffany Windows: The Indespensible Book on Louis C. Tiffany's Masterworks (1980).

The Last Supper

This reproduction of DaVinci's classic in glass is characteristic of early (1890s) Tiffany work, in which the paintings of the great masters (ancient and modern) were used as models for stained glass creations. This window is a memorial to Gustav Schwab, an early member and benefactor of the parish, who provided the church with its earliest stained glass windows from the Royal Bavarian Stained Glass Factory. (These are among the first "Munich" style windows in America, having been installed in 1865.)

The Resurrection Morn

This memorial window to Lewis G. Morris shows the desolate Mary Magdalen weeping at the tomb, while the risen Christ appears in the distance. The extreme chiaroscuro renders the Magdalen almost invisible in the shadows, even in the brightest sunlight.

This window is based on a design by German artist Heinrich Hoffman. Another version of this window, without the rich floral elaboration, was executed for the Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan. Tiffany added the flowers for the version at Saint James!

The True Vine

Images of the wheat and the vine play against each other in this early masterpiece. Note the use of three-dimensional glass for the grapes, and the layering of the wheat. The exterior photograph of the restored window shows how Tiffany incorporated many layers into the final production. This window is marked "Tiffany Glass and Decorating Co." and dates from 1895.

We are pleased to report that the New York Landmarks Conservancy has awarded a $7,250 matching grant from its Sacred Sites program to restore this beautiful window, endangered by shifting masonry. The funds for this grant were made available from The Tiffany Co. Foundation. Contributions towards this project will be graefully accepted and applied towards matching this grant.

In the crown in the top trefoil, large pieces of glass are used as "jewels." These two photographs indicate how the changing effect of angle and sunlight at different times of day give life and animation to the windows. The left image is taken in indirect morning light; the image at the right is taken illuminated by the afternoon sun.

This window is a memorial to Hugh Nesbitt Camp, a leading Fordham citizen. Camp was among the members of the commission appointed by Mayor of New York Franklin Edson (also a member of St James Fordham) to research and develop improvements to New York City's water supply. It is to the work of this commission that New York owes much of its present system.

The Resurrection Angel

This window is a memorial to Valeria Gray Treadwell, given by her husband, Col. Harry H. Treadwell, at the time (1921) the manager of Tiffany and Co. Louis Comfort Tiffany had by this time brought his Ecclesiastical Glass division into partnership with his late father's business. The details show the angel, and the amount of glass drapery sculpured on the angel's robe. This window is signed by Louis C. Tiffany.

Another view of the Resurrection Angel, under morning direct sunlight.

Saints Monica and Augustine

Also called the "Motherhood Window" in tribute to Saint Monica's inspiration upon her son Augustine to find the Christian faith, this is the latest window in the collection at Saint James, completed in 1929.Signed by Louis C. Tiffany, it represents one of his last works (he died in 1933). This may be the last work to bear his signature, as the standard reference (Duncan's Tiffany Windows) describes a signature on a church window in Hackensack as "being dated as late as 1928."

If you would like to visit Saint James to see these windows, please do not hesitate to call the church office at 718-367-0655.